The Most Interesting Blue Birds in the World

There is something special about blue birds. In fact, there are so many interesting types of blue birds that people have devoted entire books to discussing their unique features.

For example, one book might focus on the differences between the indigo bunting and the blue grosbeak, while another might highlight the various shades of blue exhibited by different species of bird. No matter what book you read, you’re sure to be fascinated by these creatures.

15 types of blue birds

can be found around the world. Each has its own unique color, behavior, and habitat preferences. Here are some of the most interesting species:

1. Blue Jay: This is one of the most recognizable blue birds in North America. They have a bright blue head, wings, and tail with white underparts. The bold black markings on their wings, heads, and tails make them stand out even more. They are primarily found in forests and woodlands throughout North America and are often seen feeding on insects and other small animals.

2. Blue-throated Hummingbird: This tiny hummingbird is found in Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize. It has a bright blue throat, chest and belly. Its wings are brownish-gray with speckles of blue. They feed on small insects, nectar from flowers, and sap from trees.

Blue-throated Hummingbird:

3. Blue Fairy Wrens: These wrens are native to Australia and have a stunning iridescent blue plumage. The males have bright blue throats, chests and bellies while the females are a duller blue. They feed on insects, spiders and other small invertebrates found in their habitat.

4. Blue-crowned Manakin: These birds are found in Central America from Mexico to northern Panama. The males have a bright blue crown with a reddish-brown body. The females are brown with a white throat and belly. They feed on insects, spiders and small fruits.

5. Blue-footed Booby: These large seabirds are found in tropical and subtropical ocean waters around the world. They have bright blue webbed feet and long pointed beaks. Their diet consists mainly of small fish.

6. Blue-breasted Quail: This species of quail is native to Africa and has a blue breast with black and white barring on its wings, back, and tail. They feed mainly on seeds, fruits, and insects.

. Blue-breasted Quail:

7. Indigo Bunting: This small American songbird has a beautiful blue head, wings, and tail with white underparts. The males are particularly striking in the spring when their plumage is at its brightest. They feed mainly on insects and seeds.

8. Blue Grosbeak: This species of songbird is native to North America and Mexico and has a bright blue body with black wings and tail. They feed on insects, seeds, and berries.

9. Bluebird: This is one of the most iconic blue birds in North America. They have a bright blue head, wings, and tail with white underparts. Males are particularly striking in the spring when their feathers take on an iridescent shade of blue. They feed on insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates.

10. Blue-winged Teal: This species of duck is native to much of North America and has a bright blue head with white stripes along the sides. The wings have blue panels at the tips and they feed mainly on aquatic insects, seeds, and plants.

Blue-winged Teal:

11. Blue-crowned Conure: This brightly colored bird is native to Central and South America and has a bright blue crown with green wings, back, and tail. They feed mainly on fruits, nuts, seeds, and insects.

12. White-throated Needle tail: This species of swift is found in Asia and has a white throat with a brilliant blue back, wings, and tail. They feed mainly on insects in flight such as flying ants and beetles.

13. Black-capped Chickadee: This North American species of songbird has a black cap and bright blue wings and tail. They feed mainly on insects, spiders, seeds, and berries.

Black-capped Chickadee

14. Plain-backed Thrush: This species of songbird is found in parts of southeastern Asia and has a plain brown back with a bright blue head and wings. They feed mainly on insects, berries, and other fruits.

15. Blue-winged Warbler: This species of songbird is native to much of North America and has a bright blue head, wings, and tail with white underparts. They feed on insects, spiders, and other small invertebrates.  They are often seen in gardens and woodlands throughout their range.  The males are particularly striking in the spring when they sing their melodic song.

 Blue-winged Warbler

Mountain Bluebird

Mountain Bluebirds are cavity-nesting birds that typically nest in open woodlands, fields, and meadows.  They will also use artificial nesting boxes provided they are placed in suitable locations. The female builds the nest out of twigs, grasses, and feathers before laying her eggs.

Mountain Bluebirds usually lay 4–6 eggs in a single clutch, which hatch after 12-14 days. The young birds typically fledge within 2–3 weeks of hatching, and the adults continue to feed them for an additional two weeks before they can become fully independent. During this period, both parents work together to protect the nest site from predators and provide food for their young.

They may also use their bright blue plumage to distract predators away from the nest. Additionally, they have been known to work together with other Mountain Bluebird pairs in order to protect and defend their nests. This behavior is known as cooperative breeding, which is uncommon among most bird species.  Ultimately, this helps ensure the survival of Mountain Bluebird populations and their eggs.

Eastern bluebird nesting habits

Eastern bluebird nesting habits

Eastern bluebirds are cavity-nesting birds that typically nest in well-drained, open woodlands and fields. They will also use artificial nesting boxes provided they are placed in suitable locations.  The female builds the nest out of twigs, grasses, and feathers before laying her eggs.

Eastern bluebirds usually lay 3–7 eggs in a single clutch, which hatch after 12-14 days. The young birds typically fledge within 2–3 weeks of hatching, and the adults continue to feed them for an additional two weeks before they can become fully independent.

During this period, both parents work together to protect the nest site from predators and provide food for their young.

What birds lay blue eggs?

The following birds lay blue eggs: Quail, Guillemots, Puffins, Gulls, Shorebirds, Terns, Cormorants and some species of ducks. These birds typically have either bright blue or pale greenish-blue colored eggs. The pigment which produces the coloring is known as biliverdin and is produced in the shells of the birds’ eggs.

It is believed to be a form of protection, deterring predators from eating them by making them less visible than white or brown eggs. In some cases, blue-colored eggs may also be more temperature resistant, which can help to protect developing embryos. 

Additionally, some species of birds use the color of their eggs to distinguish them from the eggs of other species, helping to prevent interspecies competition for resources. 

The coloration may also be used in courtship displays, as some birds may recognize the blue hue more easily than other hues. 

Thus, blue eggshells can help a bird identify its own eggs and deter it from laying eggs in another bird’s nest.Ultimately, the purpose of blue eggshells varies from species to species, and may have both practical and evolutionary advantages for some birds.

How do colors protect eggs from the sun?

How do colors protect eggs from the sun?

Colors can protect eggs from the sun in a variety of ways. Darker colors absorb more sunlight than lighter colors, so darkly colored eggs are less likely to become too hot when exposed to direct sunlight. This is especially true for birds that nest in sunny environments, such as open fields and beaches, where their eggs may be exposed to high levels of ultraviolet radiation.

Conclusion

Birds that are blue, such as Mountain Bluebirds and Eastern Bluebirds, have adapted over time to protect their eggs from predators by using bright colors or patterns. Other birds, such as Quail, Guillemots, Puffins, Gulls, Shorebirds, Terns and some species of ducks lay blue eggs which may also provide them with protection from predators and temperature extremes.

Additionally, darkly colored eggs absorb more sunlight than lighter-colored eggs, which helps to protect the birds’ embryos in sunny environments. Ultimately, birds have developed a variety of strategies to help keep their eggs safe, enabling more birds to survive and reproduce.

FAQS

What kind of bird is royal blue?

The royal blue bird, also known as the Eastern Bluebird, is a small songbird native to North America. They are usually found in open woodlands and fields and typically nest in cavities or in artificial nesting boxes.  Male birds are bright blue with an orange breast while female birds are grayish-blue with an olive breast.

What is a blue Sparrow called?

The blue sparrow is a species of finch known as the Blue-headed Sparrow (Passerina bicalcarata). It is native to Central and South America and has vivid blue plumage on its head, neck and upper breast. The remainder of its body is streaked with white and yellow markings.  They inhabit open woodlands and can often be seen foraging on the ground in small flocks.  They are omnivorous birds, eating insects, seeds and berries.

What are female blue birds called?

Female bluebirds are simply called female bluebirds. They are typically grayish-blue in color with an olive breast and lack the bright orange breast of the male birds. Female birds also tend to be slightly larger than male birds, though this is not always noticeable when they are in flight.  Additionally, female birds usually have darker bills and irises than male birds. Female blue birds can be found in the same habitats as their male counterparts.

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